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Philip Feldman

“I’m looking at how intelligent agents (humans and otherwise) interact and coordinate using technology. There are common patterns, dimension reduction, current state, orientation, and velocity that appear universal.”

 

Hometown: Catonsville MD

Degree Program: Human-Centered Computing (PhD)

Faculty Advisor: Wayne Lutters

Thesis/research topic: Detecting and mapping belief behaviors in digital environments at scale

Previous Undergraduate Study:
1984 BA UMD

Additional Graduate Study:
1996 MS JHU

Why did you decide to attend UMBC? And why did you choose your program in particular?
UMBC was close, and offered human-centered computing.

What are some of the benefits of being involved in the graduate community at UMBC?
The people, the library, the surprising basketball team. We have an adorable mascot.

What is your favorite thing about UMBC?
The size of the campus. Not too big/small.

Briefly describe your graduate research and its purpose/application.
I’m looking at how intelligent agents (humans and otherwise) interact and coordinate using technology. There are common patterns, dimension reduction, current state, orientation, and velocity that appear universal.

Have you worked on any specific research projects that you would like to highlight?
I’ve presented at Collective Intelligence 2017, HCIC 2017, and CHIIR 2018. I’ve submitted a *lot* of papers, and am pleased to say that the rejections are getting nicer.

What are your plans after you complete your degree at UMBC?
I am already using my research to adjust my current job, which is a pleasant surprise. I think the thesis will make for an interesting book.

When you are not conducting research, what are your hobbies or interests?
Cycling in places with big hills.

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