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UMBC named one of the nation’s top academic workplaces

for 8th consecutive year

July 17, 2017 3:33 PM
July 17, 2017 by Dinah Winnick

The Chronicle of Higher Education has just named UMBC one of the nation’s top academic workplaces for the eighth year in a row. UMBC is one of 18 large universities from across United States to be recognized on the “Great Colleges to Work For” list, and one of just ten large universities to featured on the distinguished “honor roll” for institutions that excel in nearly every measured category.

The Chronicle develops its list annually based on workplace policies and findings from a robust survey that asks faculty, staff, and administrators to rate their workplaces on a variety of factors. The publication’s 2017 survey received responses from more than 45,000 employees of 155 four-year and 77 two-year institutions nationwide.

This is the sixth consecutive year that the Chronicle has featured UMBC on its prized “honor roll” list, thanks to UMBC’s high ratings in the following categories:

Collaborative Governance
Compensation & Benefits
Confidence in Senior Leadership
Facilities, Workspace & Security
Job Satisfaction
Professional/Career Development
Respect and Appreciation
Supervisor/Department Chair Relationship
Teaching Environment (Faculty Only)
Tenure Clarity & Process (Faculty Only/4-year Only)
Work/Life Balance

This recognition affirms that “UMBC is a community that truly cares about people,” says President Freeman Hrabowski. He shared with the Chronicle:

Our faculty, staff, and students believe that excellence and inclusiveness can — and must —�� go hand in hand. That conviction forms the core of our teaching-and-learning philosophy and has made us one of the most innovative universities in the country. People know that they can take risks because even if they fail, this community will be supportive.

In other recent rankings news, both Forbes and Money magazines also just recognized UMBC as a “great investment” for students. 

Photo by Marlayna Demond ’11 for UMBC.
Tags: community